Remembering for peace

On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918 the guns fell silent and World War I ended. More than 100 years later, at 11.00am on 11 November, the nations will pause to remember. In silence and hope.

two poppies, red and white with Q peace badge
Many chose to wear both red and white poppies together. (Photo: Nik Dadson)

In sombre days of Remembrance, many Quakers choose to wear red or white poppies. Some wear both together.

The first red poppies were sold by the Royal British Legion in 1921 to support World War I veterans and to remember service men and women killed in conflict. In 1933, the white poppies were introduced by the Women's Cooperative Guild, to say very clearly, “No more wars. No more killing. Let us work for peace."

The white poppy represents the hope of peace. They represent remembrance for all victims of war, a commitment to peace and a challenge to attempts to glamorise or celebrate war.

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No more wars. No more killing. Let us work for peace.

- Women's Cooperative Guild

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Quakers have compassion for all those affected by war including injured and disabled military and civilians everywhere and their families. And they recall the courage of conscientious objectors who refused to fight because they refused to kill.

This leaflet from Quaker Committee for Christian and Interfaith Relations offers support and advice around remembrance.

The Peace Pledge Union makes and distributes white poppies. Order here . They are on sale in many Quaker meeting houses. This year they are not available from Friends House.

Armistice Day is on Thursday 11 November and Remembrance Sunday on 14 November.

Around the country Quakers will be joining countless events, including these:

The Peace Pledge Union will hold the National Alternative Remembrance Ceremony at noon in Tavistock Square in London on Remembrance Sunday.

On Armistice Day at 10.55am Clevedon Quakers will be laying a while poppy wreath and having a short meeting for worship at the Peace Tree on the seafront.

On Remembrance Day, all are welcome to a gathering at 2.00pm in Brighton organised by Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

Many PPU events are listed here:

Read more on conscientious objectors